Describe how the narrator in 'The Cutting of My Long Hair' resists and fights against the attempt of shingling her long and heavy hair. How is she ultimately made to lose her distinct cultural identity?

Question: Describe how the narrator in 'The Cutting of My Long Hair' resists and fights against the attempt of shingling her long and heavy hair. How is she ultimately made to lose her distinct cultural identity?

Answer: The narrator’s friend Judewin gave her a terrible warning. She knew a few words of English. She had overheard the 'pale-faced woman'. She had talked about cutting the long and heavy hair of Native American girls. It was shocking news. Their mothers had taught them that shingled hair was worn only by cowards. Judewin advised her to submit. The narrator had made a decision. She was not to submit. She was to struggle and fight against that oppression. The narrator disappeared unnoticed. She crawled under the bed and cuddled herself in the dark corner. She shuddered with fear whenever she heard footsteps nearby. Voices became louder. They stormed into the room. She was dragged out. She resisted by kicking and scratching wildly. She was carried downstairs and tied fast to a chair. Then they gnawed off her long and beautiful hair. No one came forward to help her. Nor was anybody present there to console her. Thus, the narrator lost her distinct cultural recognition and identity. Now she was only one of the many little animals driven by a herder.


Describe how the narrator in 'The Cutting of My Long Hair' resists and fights against the attempt of shingling her long and heavy hair. How is she ultimately made to lose her distinct cultural identity?


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